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Β· 5 min read
Jeffrey Aven

I have used the instructions here to configure Snowpipe for several projects.

Although it is accurate, it is entirely click-ops oriented. I like to automate (and script) everything, so I have created a fully automated implementation using PowerShell, the aws and snowsql CLIs.

The challenge is that you need to go back and forth between AWS and Snowflake, exchanging information from each platform with the other.

Overview

A Role Based Storage Integration in Snowflake allows a user (an AWS user arn) in your Snowflake account to use a role in your AWS account, which in turns enables access to S3 and KMS resources used by Snowflake for an external stage.

The following diagram explains this (along with the PlantUML code used to create the diagram..):

Snowflake S3 Storage Integration

Setup

Some prerequisites (removed for brevity):

  1. set the following variables in your script:
  • $accountid – your AWS account ID
  • $bucketname – the bucket you are letting Snowflake use as an External Stage
  • $bucketarn – used in policy statements (you could easily derive this from the bucket name)
  • $kmskeyarn – assuming you are used customer managed encryption keys, your Snowflake storage integration will need to use these to decrypt data in the stage
  • $prefix – if you want to set up granular access (on a key/path basis)
  1. Configure Snowflake access credentials using environment variables or using the ~/.snowsql/config file (you should definitely use the SNOWSQL_PWD env var for your password however)
  2. Configure access to AWS using aws configure
note

The actions performed in both AWS and Snowflake required privileged access on both platforms.

The Code

I have broken this into steps, the complete code is included at the end of the article.

Create Policy Documents

You will need to create the policy documents to allow the role you will create to access objects in the target S3 bucket, you will also need an initial β€œAssume Role” policy document which will be used to create the role and then updated with information you will get from Snowflake later.

Create Snowflake Access Policy

Use the snowflake_policy_doc.json policy document created in the previous step to create a managed policy, you will need the arn returned in a subsequent statement.

Create Snowflake IAM Role

Use the initial assume_role_policy_doc.json created to create a new Snowflake access role, you will need the arn for this resource when you configure the Storage Integration in Snowflake.

Attach S3 Access Policy to the Role

Now you will attach the snowflake-access-policy to the snowflake-access-role using the $policyarn captured from the policy creation statement.

Create Storage Integration in Snowflake

Use the snowsql CLI to create a Storage Integration in Snowflake supplying the $rolearn captured from the role creation statement.

Get STORAGE_AWS_IAM_USER_ARN and STORAGE_AWS_EXTERNAL_ID

You will need the STORAGE_AWS_IAM_USER_ARN and STORAGE_AWS_EXTERNAL_ID values for the storage integration you created in the previous statement, these will be used to updated the assume role policy in your snowflake-access-role.

Update Snowflake Access Policy

Using the STORAGE_AWS_IAM_USER_ARN and STORAGE_AWS_EXTERNAL_ID values retrieved in the previous statements, you will update the assume-role-policy for the snowflake-access-role.

Test the Storage Integration

To test the connectivity between your Snowflake account and your AWS external stage using the Storage Integartion just created, create a stage as shown here:

Now list objects in the stage (assuming there are any).

list @my_stage;

This should just work! You can use your storage integration to create different stages for different paths in your External Stage bucket and use both of these objects to create Snowpipes for automated ingestion. Enjoy!

Complete Code

The complete code for this example is shown here:

Β· One min read
Jeffrey Aven

Snowflake allows roles to be assigned to other roles, so when a user is assigned to a role, they may inherit the ability to use countless other roles.

Challenge: recursively enumerate all roles for a given user

One solution would be to create a complex query on the β€œSNOWFLAKE"."ACCOUNT_USAGE"."GRANTS_TO_ROLES" object.

An easier solution is to use a stored procedure to recurse through grants for a given user and return an ARRAY of roles for that user.

This is a good programming exercise in tail call recursion (sort of) in JavaScript. Here is the code:

To call the stored proc, execute:

One drawback of stored procedures in Snowflake is that they can only have scalar or array return types and cannot be used directly in a SQL query, however you can use the table(result_scan(last_query_id())) trick to get around this, as shown below where we will pivot the ARRAY into a record set with the array elements as rows:

IMPORTANT

This query must be the next statement run immediately after the CALL statement and cannot be run again until you run another CALL statement.

More adventures with Snowflake soon!